‘Color Alchemy’ with the blend of tradition and modernity

Artist Sunil Ranjit and Artist Vincent Greby at the exhibition 'Color Alchemy' at Kisimaka, Thamel.
Artist Sunil Ranjit and Artist Vincent Greby at the exhibition ‘Color Alchemy’ at Kisimaka, Thamel.

Nepali artist Sunil Ranjit and French-born artist Vincent Greby’s painting exhibition ‘Color Alchemy’ is on display at Kisimaka, Mandala Street, Thamel. The exhibition curated by Meena Lama began on February 9.

Upon stepping into the gallery, visitors are greeted not by the typical atmosphere of a gallery, but rather by one reminiscent of a cosy living room. Here, the paintings exude vibrancy, creating a serene setting conducive to engaging conversations.

Kismat Shrestha, an architect by profession and the proprietor of Kisimaka, also aspires to the same and envisions his establishment as more than just a gallery space. For this, he conceptualises the use of contemporary Nepali art in textiles and Kisimaka as an art hub. As such, Ranjit’s one of the paintings has transformed into a beautiful and elegant pashmina shawl, which is also on display.

He says, “This is just the beginning and a way to reach out to international platforms promoting Nepali art that has the blend of tradition and contemporary essence.”

Mystical dance

Painting by artist Sunil Ranjit at the exhibition Color Alchemy at Kisimaka, Thamel.
Painting by artist Sunil Ranjit at the exhibition Color Alchemy at Kisimaka, Thamel.

In line with the title of the exhibition, the displays have brought together a show with a blend of colours and imagination that can be transformed into fabrics.

Chhipa from the Newa community, known for fabric dyeing in Kathmandu Valley, are responsible for blending colours and imagination into fabrics. The Rasta-coloured scarfs used by Majipa Lakhe (mask dancer) during Indrajatra are prepared by the Chhipa community, which is just one example.

Artist Ranjit belongs to the same community. Moreover, Ranjit’s family used to dye fabrics for laypeople to the King of Nepal. To pay homage to the ancient skill and tradition, a section has been given where photographs of people wearing traditionally dyed clothes are on display along with information about the Chhipa community.

Photographs dedicated to pay homage to Chippa community in the exhibition.
Photographs dedicated to paying homage to the Chippa community in the exhibition, Color Alchemy.

In Ranjit’s painting Lakhe Aaju, he has created a figure of Majipa Lakhe in abstract form. When you look at the painting close up you will not notice any figure, you will just see blobs of different hues of yellow, black, red and more in acrylic colour. But if you look at the same painting from a distance you will see a figure who is dancing vigorously and that figure is Majipa Lakhe.

The blend of colours and imagination

Painting by Artist Vincent Greby at the exhibition 'Color Alchemy' at Kisimaka, Thamel.
Painting by Artist Vincent Greby at the exhibition ‘Color Alchemy’ at Kisimaka, Thamel.

About the exhibition Lama says, “The exhibition Color Alchemy, intends to harness the inherent properties of colour to evoke profound emotional and spiritual responses, akin to the alchemists of old, sought to transmute base metals into gold.”

According to her, Ranjit and Greby use colour(s) as their medium to transmute raw emotion into exquisite visual compositions. Each brushstroke becomes a catalyst for transformation, as colours blend to form an intricate array of thoughts and feelings.

“Together, the works of Ranjit and Greby offer a profound exploration of colour alchemy, where each stroke of the brush manifests enchantment and invites viewers to witness the mystical dance of colours on canvases,” adds Lama.

Ranjit’s abstract paintings showcase the blend of light and dark through hues where they move in different directions forming a scenario of dance. He uses vibrant and soft hues such as pink, green, and blue along with red, black grey and more. He hopes that the viewers of his paintings can contemplate the use of colours and motions in their journeys, interactions or interpretations within his paintings.

Moreover, Greby’s paintings are inspired by his experiences living between Nepal, Korea and France. He believes his paintings are his self-representation and that paintings should evoke universal feelings that transcend cultural and linguistic barriers.

In his paintings, viewers can see the use of minimal colours and motifs. He has used ocher tones in his painting and has a sense of harmony. In his painting ‘Self-portrait’, using minimal lines and circles on an ocher-toned background, he has created a portrait of himself in a ghostly or mysterious manner.


Color Alchemy showcases the use of art in lifestyle and if you too want to experience the same visit the exhibition that continues till March 15.

The post ‘Color Alchemy’ with the blend of tradition and modernity appeared first on OnlineKhabar English News.

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